As I Lie Here

As I lie here, wanting to remember if you, still, sometimes love me, as I, still, all of the time, love you, I feel your absence weigh down on the wrinkled body of the mattress on which I lie and our legs once shuffled themselves beneath these white sheets. As I lie here, tracing the letters formed by the curves of your hair, I can read the ways in which we wrote our love between the margins of this bed frame. All of this, I can remember, as I lie here, but what good are these recollections if they rest…

Dreams a lot like love

She knew me when I was different. She knew me when I believed in complete unfettered love. I believed in the kind of love that makes an introvert extroverted. The kind of love where you spend hours scribbling down romantic poems during a college lecture, and the kind of love that moves you to read said love poem in front of a room full of adults—just because she’s there and because you’re a romantic. I was a romantic and that’s when Kelly knew me. The last time I saw her was last night. We were swimming. Well, she was swimming…

After 1 month in India, this is what I’ve learned

I still have a lot of learning to do, but I have noticed that there are global context to issues that I have thought to be “American” problems. I haven’t been able to dive into Indian politics, so I can’t really say too much about it, but I’m still a child when it comes to this and I’m still growing and trying to figure it out.

In the Wake of Ferguson, Where Are Standards for Equity?

Originally posted on Education Week This post is by Anthony Conwright, who teaches humanities at High Tech Middle Media Arts in San Diego. Many of us were struck by President Obama’s words in reference to Treyvon Martin: “If I had a son, he would look like Treyvon.” I do not have my own children, but I teach children, and, lately, I have had a similar revelation: Michael Brown may be in my classroom. At this point, I am struck by a stronger, more poignant revelation: Darren Wilson could be in my classroom, too. What would I teach Darren Wilson? What…

Iraq War vet, veteran activists highlight dual challenges in struggle for equality

This post can be found here, on LGBT Weekly, where it was originally published. The struggle for LGBT equality is part of the fight for civil rights for all minorities, and a continuation of the Civil Rights Movement started by Dr. Martin Luther King, Bayard Rustin and other legendary activists during the 1950s and ’60s, according to leading LGBT-rights activists. Yet, says author and activist, Rob Smith, who is an Iraq War veteran, many in the African American community resent conflation of the Civil Rights and LGBT-equality movements. Smith, who served in the United States Army as an infantry soldier…

Voice and Choice in the Classroom

This can also be found here, on Edweek.com, where it was originally published. This post is by Anthony Conwright, who teaches humanities at High Tech Middle Media Arts in San Diego. Before I started teaching I worked as an academic coach for a humanities classroom. After class one day, a Mexican student started to talk to me about history. He said, “Mr. Anthony, I know I’m learning history, but I don’t think I am learning real history. My grandpa always told me that what we learn in school isn’t the true history of Mexicans in the United States and I…

Where I’ve been on you.

Wiping away the tears on the eyelashes, on the lips, on the hands,  on the cheeks, I can see where I’ve been inside of you. I’ve been on your lips, I’ve parted them to sip the taste that’s tabled on your tongue. I’ve been inside your hands, You’ve held me as if you have latches etched onto your palms I’ve been on your cheek, I’ve been an enduring smile, after being a fleeting thought I’ve started to come out of hiding from inside now.  I am seeping from your pores. From the the question, “Should you love me now?” and the…